THANK YOU TO OUR READERS<3

-IMPACT DANCE PRODUCTIONS-

As the dance season comes to a close and students go to summer camp, parents catch up on some much needed wine tasting, readers find new books to get lost in and artists re fuel for the next season our team at Impact Dance Productions like you will be re generating in order to make 2014 the best year possible!.

We thank you for your positive feed back and faith in what we do!. With out our readers we would not be as tenacious about spreading our love of the arts with our community and with the world.

A huge thank you to our guest bloggers: (Order of blog posts)

– Joshua Beamish – Move the company 

– Mike Wollen – Foundry Films

– Kamilah Sturton – Kelowna Ballet

– Joyce Poon – Noir Lash Lounge

– Rachael Porier -Danzmode Productions

– David Cooper-  Photographer

– Sarah Dolan – O2 Company

– Angel Jutzi – Zebra Eye Dance Company

– Linda Arkelian- Instructor & Artist

– Amy Josh- Netherlands Danse Theatre

– Kristina Akester-  Student Dancer

-Robyn Banks- Fashionista

– Menina Fortunato- Dance Professional & Entrepreneur

– Gillian Abbott- Julliard NYC

– Melanie LaPatine- So You Think You Can Dance Choreographer & Celebrity Guest

– Caitlin Griffin- Professional Dancer & Choreographer

– Winnipeg Mother- Annon

– Christie Lee Manning- Industry Dance Magazine

– Dr.Lin- Naturopathic Doctor

– Alexie Geronimo- Bad Boys Of Dance

– Alexandria Crenian- Dancer for Lady Gaga

– Moe Brody- Harbour Dance Centre

– Darla Isfeld- Team Canada 

Impact Dance Productions and http://www.daniellelgardner.com are pleased to announce we will be back in early September featuring some of the finest artists and performers out there. If you missed one of our 25 blog posts this year they will continue to be on our site until next year:)

May your summers be filled with great memories, loving feelings and knowledge insurmountable to any education you have ever had before.

We wish you all a beautiful summer and in the words of Impact Dance Productions “lets make an impact one step at a time”.

Blog Made possible by : http://www.daniellelgardner.com & Impact Dance Productions

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TEAM CANADA: A Parent’s Perspective By Darla Isfeld

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TEAM CANADA- A Parents Perspective By Darla Isfeld

http://www.teamcanadadance.com

AUDITIONS ON JUNE 23rd 2013!

As I reflect on my experience as a parent who’s child is a member of the Canadian National dance team, I’d never dreamed that this would become as much of an adventure for myself as it was for my daughter!

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Team Canada 2012- Germany Team

From the minute Katheryn’s letter of acceptance to the team arrived, we were thrown into a whirlwind of excitement. Getting ready to compete at the dance world’s version of the Olympics is no small feat. Putting together the best dancers from different studios who, for the most part, didn’t know one another except on a competitive level, could have been risky. But,there is no “I” in team, so ego’s were left at the door & everyone came together with a common goal. There were only 2 months to get everything  perfect, and it takes an extremely dedicated  group of choreographers, dancers, parents, volunteers, & seamstress’s to pull it off! Once rehearsals began, my iPhone lit up with a constant stream of emails & messages and it seemed like we were constantly planning, fundraising, or driving. My hat went off to the parents that drove to each practice from as far away as Chilliwack, as I was one of the lucky one’s who lived only 5 minutes away from the rehearsal studio.
As the departure date for Frankfurt drew closer, I began to observe bond’s forming amongst the dancer’s. I think it was around the time that the team jacket’s arrived and were donned that something seemed to “click”. No longer were they representing their own studio, they were representing Canada!
We drew a lot of attention at the airport in our maple leaf jacket’s. Many curious people asked us about the team and wished us good luck!

After a 10 hour flight to Germany (and a 10 hour time difference) there was no time for rest! The team had to compete first thing in the morning, and I admired how even though they were exhausted, they diligently practiced in the hotel parking lot for 2 hours!

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1st day at the IDO World Championships. Performing Choreography by Joshua Beamish of Move the company.

Before the sun rose the next day, the bus left for the arena, and the kid’s broke into a spontaneous version of “Oh Canada”. Little did they know that our anthem would be played 16 times during the upcoming competition as they danced their way to the top spot on the podium.

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IDO Ceremony- 23 countries present

The International dance organization put on a fabulous, well planned event. With 1500 dancers from 23 countries, the competition took place at the Fraport Arena, a five thousand seat basketball venue which they divided into half for the competition and half for rehearsal space. I remember fondly how we parents decorated our sitting area each morning with Canadian flags. As we sat together through those long days, we too formed a lasting bond as we laughed, cried, hugged, & cheered till we were hoarse. The stress and anticipation was felt by all as we anxiously awaited to hear if we had advanced to the next round, and what the final placings were. By the end of the competition, we were all a family, parents & children alike, brought together by our passion for dance.
It mattered not what studio we danced for at home, for during that week, Team Canada was a studio in itself.
I witnessed barriers broken unlike anything I’ve ever seen before in the lower mainland dance community, and I feel we are all better for it.

The pride I felt watching Katheryn on the podium while our anthem played and flag was raised was something I could never put a monetary value on- for it was priceless! Seeing her walk in the parade of nations amongst dancers from all over the world, I realized how lucky she was to have been chosen for this opportunity. It made every penny spent and every bit of effort worth it.

In closing, my thoughts return to an email sent to us from Team Director Bonnie Dyer on the eve of our departure to Germany. She wrote: ” A true champion is someone who is gracious if they win, and even more gracious if they do not. In years to come, medals & trophies will be misplaced, but the memories of your journey of training to dance on the world stage, meeting new friends, striving to do your best and being proud to represent your country- these are the memories you will carry with you forever”.
I think that says it all.

Darla Isfeld

Blog made possible by http://www.daniellelgardner.com, http://www.teamcanadadance.com,Key West Ford and Impact Dance Productions.

Follow us on Twitter: @IMPACTDancePro

“My Dance Journey To Israel” By Caitlin Griffin

Danielle Gardner and Impact Dance Productions are pleased to share a blog post by the outstanding dancer and choreographer Caitlin Griffin. We have had the pleasure of working alongside Caitlin and can boast that she is a true artist at heart that dances with passion that could warm a room and has the drive to get up and jump over some of life’s biggest hurdles.

“My Dance Journey to Israel”
By: Caitlin GriffinImage

Following a difficult year spent grant writing, crowd-funding and recovering from a serious injury, I find myself on the other side of the world, in the midst of one of the most intensive periods of personal and artistic development I have experienced. It is day 61 here in Kibbutz Ga’aton, with the Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company’s Dance Journey program and it has been worth every second of the uphill climb it was to get here.

The Dance Journey program is undeniably unique. As one of 25 dancers from around the world who gather and live on the Kibbutz, we study intensely for 5 months under the direction of some of the leading voices in contemporary dance.  We also have full access to every practical resource required for dance creation and production and the support of numerous accomplished artists.

Thanks to the support of the BC Arts Council and a dedicated community of supporters I am not only here, but well into the creation process of a new work.  My most ambitious work to date, the piece in it’s infancy has already evolved through several stages of depth and clarity; simply because of my surroundings.  While living on this serene Kibbutz, surrounded by fruit trees, cacti  and diverse wildlife, it has become easy to clear my mind of daily distractions and to explore ideas with curiosity and intensity.

With over three months left, I have been collecting many things from this experience I will try and bring to my artistic development when I return home.  I anticipate a difficult adjustment period without the family of artists and host of resources I am privileged to have here, but I will be excited to find my footing in Canada again.  My renewed energy will be spent dancing and creating with a whole new understanding of my creative potential and with a deep sense of gratitude for the journey.

Blog made possible by Caitlin Griffin, daniellelgardner.com & Impact Dance Productions

“Something in the Water” by Joshua Beamish

Danielle Gardner Founder of Impact Dance Productions would like to introduce the first of many blog posts that will be featured on www.daniellelgardner.com.

Blogs will be posted by industry greats, casting agents, hair and make up specialist and many more inspiring people.
We hope you enjoy these blogs as much as we have enjoyed creating them!
Team Canada Choreographers Joshua Beamish and  Director Danielle Gardner
January 1st 2013:
The journey through a career in this industry is always unpredictable. Dancers move where the work is, opportunities come and go with hype and the threat of an injury, large or small, is always looming. Many dancemakers have their calendars planned out three years in advance, while other artists are expected to drop everything in an instant to obtain a shot at that lifelong dream contract.

My own career path is perhaps one of the least traditional I’ve come across, having started a professional dance company at 17. In just under a decade, I have already experienced so many genre shifts that I’ve come to realize that many of the students I’m currently working with have no idea that I started out just like them. While I always placed a strong focus on ballet, primarily through the training from my mother Loretta Lachner, there was nothing I loved more than jazz. I was a Triple Threat scholarship student, Kelly Konno was my number one idol and I was sure that I too would end up dancing for Janet Jackson one day. When I heard students getting excited about attending Triple Threat this year it reminded me of how much I gained from opportunities like my Triple Threat, Groove Street or Harbour Dance Centre scholarships. These organizations gave me access to teachers who challenged me with new vocabulary and they put me in a room with the best of my peers. Through Triple Threat I experienced a week of private musical theatre training at Randolph Academy and had the opportunity to attend their first ever Hawaii Dance Experience. My experiences at Groove Street paved the way for my time dancing in the Source Dance Company and Harbour Dance Centre went on to give me support to enable the realization of my first two professional productions. Above all, I most realize that these institutions and instructors taught me that my individuality was an attribute to be celebrated. They made clear that my greatest offering to the dance world was the unique nature of an artistry that was particular to me. I haven’t forgotten this, as this truth has taken me to places I never expected possible.

In the years that have followed I gradually pulled away from the studio and competitive world, creating just a few solos and judging the odd competition. The demands of running my company simply required a complete focus. Everything else in my life took a back seat.
Since my relocation to New York I have ironically spent more time invested in outreach work with BC’s young dancers than ever before. The formation of our annual MOVE: the company Summer Intensive, in addition to creating works for Team Canada and Richmond Academy, reignited a passion for exploring the creativity and capabilities of young artists. In the past year I’ve actually found myself seeking out opportunities to have a hand in opening the minds of the next generation of professional artists. It’s steadily growing into a passion that equals my love for directing professionals.
I believe that there is something so uniquely special about the training of young dancers in British Columbia. Many of my greatest collaborators were groomed in BC’s local schools. One only needs to mention Crystal Pite, Tiffany Tregarthen, Simone Orlando, Celine Gittens and Amber Funk Barton among counless others, to realize how much incredible talent has emerged from the BC studio system. I’ve often wondered what it is that keeps BC consistently producing such evolved young artists. Is the importance placed on ballet training without the tunnel vision focus that it’s the be all and end all of dance? Is it the fact that we still have dance festivals and The Provincials, as well as the dance competition circuit? Is it that we’ve had so many truly great local success stories who’ve undeniably made it, and yet still return to BC to give knowledge and inspiration back to the next wave of movers.
It’s certainly some combination of these factors, among others, but I think that the real secret is that our dance studio ecosystem in BC celebrates the individuality of youth. Children are taught to dance in a group but allowed to grow as soloists. They are taught formalized techniques but are also exposed to improvisation. They are even often encouraged to enter student choreography and music interpretation categories at the festivals.
When I teach in BC I come across far fewer TV dance emulaters than I do anywhere else. This doesn’t mean they altogether ignore widespread mainstream influences, but it does illustrate that they know how to turn off stylistic conventions when asked. Danielle Gardner and Jeff Mortensen, two dancers who move between concert and tv dance careers including contracts with my own company, are perfect examples of artists who deftly balance commercial interest and artistic integrity. In truth, I respect that ability more. After all, being a chameleon is the only way I manged to fund a year of my contemporary dance company’s activities by taking a roles in commercial projects, not least of which being in a Nickelodeon TV movie musical with Kelly Konno.
Thank you for reading
Impact Dance Productions