THANK YOU TO OUR READERS<3

-IMPACT DANCE PRODUCTIONS-

As the dance season comes to a close and students go to summer camp, parents catch up on some much needed wine tasting, readers find new books to get lost in and artists re fuel for the next season our team at Impact Dance Productions like you will be re generating in order to make 2014 the best year possible!.

We thank you for your positive feed back and faith in what we do!. With out our readers we would not be as tenacious about spreading our love of the arts with our community and with the world.

A huge thank you to our guest bloggers: (Order of blog posts)

– Joshua Beamish – Move the company 

– Mike Wollen – Foundry Films

– Kamilah Sturton – Kelowna Ballet

– Joyce Poon – Noir Lash Lounge

– Rachael Porier -Danzmode Productions

– David Cooper-  Photographer

– Sarah Dolan – O2 Company

– Angel Jutzi – Zebra Eye Dance Company

– Linda Arkelian- Instructor & Artist

– Amy Josh- Netherlands Danse Theatre

– Kristina Akester-  Student Dancer

-Robyn Banks- Fashionista

– Menina Fortunato- Dance Professional & Entrepreneur

– Gillian Abbott- Julliard NYC

– Melanie LaPatine- So You Think You Can Dance Choreographer & Celebrity Guest

– Caitlin Griffin- Professional Dancer & Choreographer

– Winnipeg Mother- Annon

– Christie Lee Manning- Industry Dance Magazine

– Dr.Lin- Naturopathic Doctor

– Alexie Geronimo- Bad Boys Of Dance

– Alexandria Crenian- Dancer for Lady Gaga

– Moe Brody- Harbour Dance Centre

– Darla Isfeld- Team Canada 

Impact Dance Productions and http://www.daniellelgardner.com are pleased to announce we will be back in early September featuring some of the finest artists and performers out there. If you missed one of our 25 blog posts this year they will continue to be on our site until next year:)

May your summers be filled with great memories, loving feelings and knowledge insurmountable to any education you have ever had before.

We wish you all a beautiful summer and in the words of Impact Dance Productions “lets make an impact one step at a time”.

Blog Made possible by : http://www.daniellelgardner.com & Impact Dance Productions

Graphic1

“IT ALL STARTS WITH CONFIDENCE” by Christie Manning

Impact Dance Productions is pleased to feature Christie Manning the Creator and Editor-in-Chief of Industry Dance Magazine!

Please Enjoy!

“IT ALL STARTS WITH CONFIDENCE” by Christie Manning

Image

With 175 + dance studios just in the lower mainland, there are hundreds of thousands of dancers, just in BC alone, leaving their home studio every night with the wish of becoming a professional dancer one day. With the competition being so stiff, how do you set yourself apart? It all comes down to one thing: Confidence.

Before you nod your head and say, ‘Yeah yeah, I’ve heard that before,’ really listen to what I have to say. I want you to think about some of the best dancers you know. What makes them so good? What really sets them apart? Is it the fact that they can do nine pirouettes into a front aerial and land in the splits? Not necessarily. I know some incredible breakers that can’t do nine pirouettes, unless it’s on their head. It’s not the tricks. It’s not their cool hair style, or tattoo down their arm, or even their Free City sweatpants. It’s their confidence.

Every strong dancer knows they aren’t the best, but they know they’re not the worst either. Many dancers suffer from a strong sense of ego, and not in an arrogant way. Most suffer from it more in a self deprecating kind of way. Thinking “I’m not good enough” is coming from a place of ego just as much as “I’m the best” is, it’s just on the opposite side of the scale. There is nothing wrong with acknowledging that you’re talented. Read that again. There is NOTHING wrong with acknowledging that you’re talented. It’s how you present and conduct yourself with that knowledge that matters.

1. Don’t put others up on a pedestal.

Putting your teacher, your choreographer, TV stars, or even your fellow dancers up on a pedestal just keeps you at a place of ‘less than’. You are not worth less than them, are not less than them, just because you think they are stronger, better, more experienced than you. Their training or experiences do not lessen YOUR value. They may be further along their career path than you are, but everyone was where you are at one point along the way.

2. Everyone’s path is different.

One of the most frustrating things in a dancer’s career is that there is no one way to get to where you want to go. There is no diploma or master’s degree you can take that’s a surefire path to success. Every single artist will take different steps towards the career they would like to have. Therefor, it’s also one of the most beautiful things about our career. We have the option, the power, the opportunity, to shape our own career and lifestyle. There are hundreds of thousands of paths we could choose to take. By being confident and understanding who you are as an artist, you can make the appropriate steps towards the future you would like. It will be different from the dancer standing beside you. And it should be.

3. Don’t compare.

One of the most damaging things an artist can do is compare him or herself to others. This will never create anything positive. It is extremely unhealthy and a complete waste of time. You can idolize someone as long as you’d like, you will never be them, no matter how hard you try. And thank god. You will never be as good as the are, because you aren’t them. You are YOU. Why be the second best version of someone else when you could be the best version of yourself?

4. Figure out who you are.

Understanding who you are and where you fit in can be one of the most difficult processes a dancer will face. But what comes with the discovery can be career changing. It is a dancer’s responsibility to figure out what they are passionate about, and where they fit in with in the industry. What makes your heart the happiest? Working with a contemporary company, being on set, touring with an artist? Then ask yourself the hard questions. Do I have the body type and the skills to do what I want to do? If not, where would my body type and skills be most valued? Your goal is to match the two together.

5. Don’t let what you can’t do, discount what you CAN do.

You have skills you have been working hard on your whole career. Just because someone else has skills you don’t have, doesn’t devalue what you DO have. Be confident in the skills that you have. Know what you’re good at, and own it with all your being. Continue to train, work hard, and always be open to learning and growing, but be proud of your accomplishments. The strongest artists out there know what they are capable of, understand their value, and represent themselves as such.

At the end of the day, you just need to remember one thing: Be the best version of yourself. In an industry ( especially in Canada) where there are more artists than there is work, you must remember to keep the focus on yourself. Don’t be distracted by who is doing what, when, where, and how. All you need to focus on is what YOU can do, where YOU want to go, and how YOU are going to get there. Friends and colleagues will come and go, but the relationship you have with yourself is the most important. And that relationship should come with a side of confidence.

Christie Manning- Editor and Chief of Industry Dance Magazine

Blog made possible by Danielle Gardner Founder&CEO of Impact Dance Productions

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @IMPACTDancePro

http://www.daniellelgardner.com

Confessions from an Audition by Alexandra Crenian

This Tuesday  Impact Dance Productions is featuring a blog post by Toronto based dancer and choreographer Alexandra Crenian! She has worked in the dance industry for many years and has great knowledge of the audition process. Alexandra crushes her competition by not only being fierce but also by being humble, which has lead her to perform with idols such as the one and only Lady Gaga!

Confessions from an Audition by Alexandra Crenian

image

Let’s start with what happened…I walked in the door to the theatre and immediately asked one of the auditionees, “Could you tell me what room the casting is in?”  The Auditionee looked me up and down, put her hand on her hip, scoffed loudly and walked away, laughing (she was muttering some sort of rude sentence that I can’t even remember.)  Luckily, a happier, more polite human being showed me the correct room.  I can only assume that she thought I was a ‘competitor.’  Unfortunately for her, I was not only on the casting panel, I was also the choreographer.  Not only was it incredibly embarrassing for her when she realized her error, it was uncomfortable for everyone in the room who witnessed it.  Needless to say, she didn’t get the part.

        If that auditionee had truly believed in herself, she wouldn’t have felt the need to be rude, nor the need to compare herself to a stranger.  She had demonstrated a form of bullying to psych out her competition.  Not only can a bad attitude ruin your opportunities before you even get in the audition room, but it simultaneously lowers your own self-esteem.  There is no need to compare yourself to anyone else.  Chances are, even if you don’t book that particular job, you will at some point book something with other people in that very room.  If you are rude to everyone, no one will want to work alongside you.  When a person is hired for a job, they spend 8 or more hours a day with the same people.  No person would knowingly hire anyone who brings an air of negativity with them, that energy is contagious. It brings down the group.

How can a performer (or anyone) help themselves from becoming bitter and negative in professional situations? Work on yourself.  Don’t compare yourself to others, there are many qualified, talented people out there… someone else’s talent doesn’t discredit yours.  Truly confident, happy people are more willing to help others, collaborate and keep a positive energy in the room.  It’s such a small world, chances are if a person is hired once and represents themselves professionally, with a great attitude, they will continue to be hired by the same choreographer/director.  The goal shouldn’t be booking the one job, it should be creating a professional relationship by showcasing yourself and how you treat others well.  Thus ensuring you will be rehired in the future.  It is also important to realize, you never know who anyone is or who they’ll become: don’t judge them.  Most of the time, we aren’t aware of anyone’s story but our own.  The reality is everyone has had, or will have, multiple difficulties in their lifetime.  To feel like the universe owes you something because you’ve had a hard time will lead to disappointment.  Preparation, research and hard work is the key.  There is no short-cut.  The person you are competing against for a role today may end up being a person that hires you tomorrow, or vice versa.  Kindness and honesty is rare, but is very much appreciated and remembered.

Have hobbies outside of your career, when your art form becomes your income, you’ll need other outlets.  Reading, knitting, sewing, yoga, playing a musical instrument, writing… all of these are examples of  creative outlets that leave you feeling accomplished.  Staying committed to your goals, no matter how small (i.e. setting your alarm for a certain time, and actually waking up at that time) build your self confidence.  A personal favourite of mine, is to make lists: lists of goals, short and long term, grocery lists, to do lists.  The small act of crossing off what I’ve accomplished leaves me feeling exactly that, accomplished.

        The next time you’re at an audition, know that the only thing you have control over is yourself.  Your actions define who you are, how you feel about yourself, and how you regard others.  Remember the reason you love what you do and that we are truly fortunate to have the opportunity to do it.

Blog made possible by Danielle Gardner, Impact Dance Productions and Alexandra Crenien.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @IMPACTDancePro

http://www.daniellelgardner.com

The back bone of humanity by Angel Jutzi

the backbone of humanityImage

Angel Jutzi

Founding Artistic Director, Zebra Eyes Contemporary Dance

angeljutzi.com

angelchristine14@gmail.com

Twitter @AngelJutzi

 

Balance.  As dancers we associate this word with the accuracy of our positions that allows us to achieve utter perfection in our craft.  As acutely as we have defined that word in our art it can be difficult to apply the same terminology to our everyday lives.  We are at an advantage in understanding how true balance can be achieved in our lives because we spend the majority of our time internalizing it in order to identify what balance actually means for us.

 

Individually, balance means something different for each of us.  In dance, body type and alignment have a great deal of bearing on how we execute different positions.  In life, a variety of factors contribute to how we perceive our needs; we uniquely form our own views of what balance means and what works for us. It can be easy to misconstrue the physicality and emotionality of how we determine balance in dance, and also in life, when the two are parallel in many ways.

 

As dancers, we always consider ourselves lucky to have the ability to do what we are passionate about for a living.  We have honed this passion over years of hard work, dedication and expression, thus we are quite personally attached to the emotions that we have developed. As erratic and irrational as our emotions may seem from time to time, we stand strong and confident that we are in tune to our passions and our ability to begrounded in the world around us through movement.  Because of our emotional involvement with our art we sometimes lose sight of how to bring stability into our lives.  But, is that notexactly what we are doing?

 

Stability and balance are two words that go hand in hand while we strive to execute the myriad of challenges, both technically and artistically, that are thrown at us.  In the studio and on stage we tackle it with a strength and confidence that can only come from years of practice, self-reflection, and self-realization.  Why is it then, that outside of a studio we struggle to utilize the skills that we have worked so hard to call our own?

 

Because we are involved in our art in such an up close and personal way it can be difficult to see the big picture.  And, the big picture is this.   We are unique creatures who have the ability to identify with our needs on a deep emotional level.  This is our passion.  We spend hours upon hours building technical skills in order to help us portray these emotions to the best of our abilityto the world around us creating a richer cultural understandingof who we are.  We are the backbone of humanity.

 

I understand the weight of this statement may seem heavy and, albeit, a bit dramatic.  The term “dancer” is a simple definition of who we are and what we do.  We are so much more than a simple term.  In order to become a true dancer, an artist, the universe requires us to delve into every inch of who we are.  Every moment of our lives is spent trying to be better, achieve more, and mean something.  This is inspiration.  And, inspiration is what this world needs.

 Blog made possible by Impact Dance Productions and http://www.daniellelgardner.com