PURSUE THE PROCESS By IMPACT Dance Workshop Guest Teacher JULIO FUENTES

We are pleased to feature Julio Fuentes as this weeks guest blogger.

Julio will be joining Danielle Gardner, Charlene Hart, Jonathan Arsenault, Ivivva Athletica and Hari Om Yoga at IMPACT Dance Productions Dance workshop coming up on Aug 18th 2013 .

To find out more about the workshop please visit : http://www.daniellelgardner.com and hit “WORKSHOP”

Or Visit:

https://impactdanceproductions.ticketbud.com/impact-dance-workshop

JULIO FUENTES:

Image

Pursue The Process…

…not the glory (or the destination).
Why do we get so caught up with the end product?  I am especially guilty of this, being a perfectionist.  I always need for things to look a certain way, to be “perfect” so to speak… but in doing that, I neglect the process; the means through which I get where I need to be.  When I need to make a change, I expect it to happen with one quick yank of the steering wheel rather than slowing down and making the u-turn.  Needless to say, I have expected the same thing from other people.
This is also quite evident in a lot of dancers I know… but before I proceed, let me preface this with saying that, once again, this is not accusatory.  This is simply an observation.  Every dancer wants to be better… but once they realize what that involves, a lot of them shy away or give up.  You can’t have your “status” without all the work that comes before it.  I see dancers as swords… their bodies are their weapons.  How does a sword become sharp and refined?  It has to go through the fire and beaten over and over again… THAT is the process that we put ourselves through.  And as difficult as it can get, there is such beauty in it.  Pure gold emerges only after fire. 
And even then…
You dance and you dance and you dance… your body starts to get dull.  Guess what?  You go through the fire again.  There never really is a point at which you stop.  There is always something to learn, something new to experience.  THAT is the beauty of the process:  it never ends.  And if we go through it with joy, a healthy state of mind, and a heck of a lot of humility… we start to see the purpose in the process.  We stop holding onto this rigid and absolute “end product” that we have in our heads and start freeing ourselves to go through the process and grow… not just as dancers or artists, but as human beings. 
I learned this the hard way, and I’m still learning…
…and I’m grateful for it. 
 
By Julio Fuentes
 
Blog made possible by Danielle Gardner, Julio Fuentes and IMPACT Dance Productions

 

THANK YOU TO OUR READERS<3

-IMPACT DANCE PRODUCTIONS-

As the dance season comes to a close and students go to summer camp, parents catch up on some much needed wine tasting, readers find new books to get lost in and artists re fuel for the next season our team at Impact Dance Productions like you will be re generating in order to make 2014 the best year possible!.

We thank you for your positive feed back and faith in what we do!. With out our readers we would not be as tenacious about spreading our love of the arts with our community and with the world.

A huge thank you to our guest bloggers: (Order of blog posts)

– Joshua Beamish – Move the company 

– Mike Wollen – Foundry Films

– Kamilah Sturton – Kelowna Ballet

– Joyce Poon – Noir Lash Lounge

– Rachael Porier -Danzmode Productions

– David Cooper-  Photographer

– Sarah Dolan – O2 Company

– Angel Jutzi – Zebra Eye Dance Company

– Linda Arkelian- Instructor & Artist

– Amy Josh- Netherlands Danse Theatre

– Kristina Akester-  Student Dancer

-Robyn Banks- Fashionista

– Menina Fortunato- Dance Professional & Entrepreneur

– Gillian Abbott- Julliard NYC

– Melanie LaPatine- So You Think You Can Dance Choreographer & Celebrity Guest

– Caitlin Griffin- Professional Dancer & Choreographer

– Winnipeg Mother- Annon

– Christie Lee Manning- Industry Dance Magazine

– Dr.Lin- Naturopathic Doctor

– Alexie Geronimo- Bad Boys Of Dance

– Alexandria Crenian- Dancer for Lady Gaga

– Moe Brody- Harbour Dance Centre

– Darla Isfeld- Team Canada 

Impact Dance Productions and http://www.daniellelgardner.com are pleased to announce we will be back in early September featuring some of the finest artists and performers out there. If you missed one of our 25 blog posts this year they will continue to be on our site until next year:)

May your summers be filled with great memories, loving feelings and knowledge insurmountable to any education you have ever had before.

We wish you all a beautiful summer and in the words of Impact Dance Productions “lets make an impact one step at a time”.

Blog Made possible by : http://www.daniellelgardner.com & Impact Dance Productions

Graphic1

TEAM CANADA: A Parent’s Perspective By Darla Isfeld

 Image

TEAM CANADA- A Parents Perspective By Darla Isfeld

http://www.teamcanadadance.com

AUDITIONS ON JUNE 23rd 2013!

As I reflect on my experience as a parent who’s child is a member of the Canadian National dance team, I’d never dreamed that this would become as much of an adventure for myself as it was for my daughter!

Image
Team Canada 2012- Germany Team

From the minute Katheryn’s letter of acceptance to the team arrived, we were thrown into a whirlwind of excitement. Getting ready to compete at the dance world’s version of the Olympics is no small feat. Putting together the best dancers from different studios who, for the most part, didn’t know one another except on a competitive level, could have been risky. But,there is no “I” in team, so ego’s were left at the door & everyone came together with a common goal. There were only 2 months to get everything  perfect, and it takes an extremely dedicated  group of choreographers, dancers, parents, volunteers, & seamstress’s to pull it off! Once rehearsals began, my iPhone lit up with a constant stream of emails & messages and it seemed like we were constantly planning, fundraising, or driving. My hat went off to the parents that drove to each practice from as far away as Chilliwack, as I was one of the lucky one’s who lived only 5 minutes away from the rehearsal studio.
As the departure date for Frankfurt drew closer, I began to observe bond’s forming amongst the dancer’s. I think it was around the time that the team jacket’s arrived and were donned that something seemed to “click”. No longer were they representing their own studio, they were representing Canada!
We drew a lot of attention at the airport in our maple leaf jacket’s. Many curious people asked us about the team and wished us good luck!

After a 10 hour flight to Germany (and a 10 hour time difference) there was no time for rest! The team had to compete first thing in the morning, and I admired how even though they were exhausted, they diligently practiced in the hotel parking lot for 2 hours!

Image

1st day at the IDO World Championships. Performing Choreography by Joshua Beamish of Move the company.

Before the sun rose the next day, the bus left for the arena, and the kid’s broke into a spontaneous version of “Oh Canada”. Little did they know that our anthem would be played 16 times during the upcoming competition as they danced their way to the top spot on the podium.

Image
IDO Ceremony- 23 countries present

The International dance organization put on a fabulous, well planned event. With 1500 dancers from 23 countries, the competition took place at the Fraport Arena, a five thousand seat basketball venue which they divided into half for the competition and half for rehearsal space. I remember fondly how we parents decorated our sitting area each morning with Canadian flags. As we sat together through those long days, we too formed a lasting bond as we laughed, cried, hugged, & cheered till we were hoarse. The stress and anticipation was felt by all as we anxiously awaited to hear if we had advanced to the next round, and what the final placings were. By the end of the competition, we were all a family, parents & children alike, brought together by our passion for dance.
It mattered not what studio we danced for at home, for during that week, Team Canada was a studio in itself.
I witnessed barriers broken unlike anything I’ve ever seen before in the lower mainland dance community, and I feel we are all better for it.

The pride I felt watching Katheryn on the podium while our anthem played and flag was raised was something I could never put a monetary value on- for it was priceless! Seeing her walk in the parade of nations amongst dancers from all over the world, I realized how lucky she was to have been chosen for this opportunity. It made every penny spent and every bit of effort worth it.

In closing, my thoughts return to an email sent to us from Team Director Bonnie Dyer on the eve of our departure to Germany. She wrote: ” A true champion is someone who is gracious if they win, and even more gracious if they do not. In years to come, medals & trophies will be misplaced, but the memories of your journey of training to dance on the world stage, meeting new friends, striving to do your best and being proud to represent your country- these are the memories you will carry with you forever”.
I think that says it all.

Darla Isfeld

Blog made possible by http://www.daniellelgardner.com, http://www.teamcanadadance.com,Key West Ford and Impact Dance Productions.

Follow us on Twitter: @IMPACTDancePro

David Cooper-Photographer

In 1978, with an interest in photographing dance, I was fortunate to receive a Canada Council grant to travel to the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. I spent two weeks in their studios photographing the morning class and rehearsals. At night I set up a small darkroom in a friends bathroom and made contact sheets from the days work. I would post them on the board and get the dancers feedback. I learned the language of ballet there. Jeté, arabesque, plie, demi, turnout, were all terms new to me. Even though I have never taken a dance class, I can now give notes to a ballet dancer when I see something that is wrong during a studio shoot. You will hear me say “let me see that back arm”, “flatten the line to make the legs longer”,  “drop your shoulders”, “can you match that arm to your leg.” It’s a constant barrage of notes to get the lines perfect. A lot of dance does not translate well when frozen in a still. What is needed for the still camera is much more specific than what is presented on stage during a live performance.

Image

EVELYN HART (1980) Photo credit: David Cooper

There is a beauty and striving for perfection in ballet that I found in Evelyn Hart who was a soloist with the company in 1978. It was only two years later that she won the gold metal at International Ballet Competition in Varna, Bulgaria.

Performance here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_ycPIV4hEQ&feature=share

I was invited back to the RWB in 1980 to shoot their promo photos and souvenir book. This began a 30 year relationship with the company.

Image

Evelyn was the only dancer who would discuss lighting before a shoot. She would suggest silhouette or back light and have a clear idea of what she wanted in her photographs.

 

She brought tremendous energy and a sense of humor to the photo sessions that demystified how big a star she was. Here she is during a photocall for Giselle goofing around with a big nose and glasses.

Image

(Evelyn&Emily)

 

In July of 1985 my daughter Emily was born. A month later I had my annual trip to the RWB to set up a studio and shoot the company. I brought the family with me and Evelyn presented us with the smallest pair of ballet slippers for our 5 week old daughter. She held Emily over her head on pointe and my daughter was introduced to the world of ballet being partnered by one of the greatest ballerinas of our time.

 

Image

 Evelyn was a very passionate dancer, like a great actress. She was very sensitive to music too. I remember she was once reviewing a contact sheet from Giselle. There were these blurred images during the mad scene where the light was too low to get a high enough shutter to freeze the motion. I thought I had messed up technically but she got really excited when she saw those frames and said the blurs felt exactly like she feels in that moment. The motion and blurs were perfect according to her. The camera was in sync with her emotions. She felt things in a very deep way through dance and I was responding to them with my camera.

There is a permanence to a still photo that lives on forever so ballet dancers are by far the most critical of themselves in pictures and by nature very hard to please.  But I love the challenge. To this day, I love shooting during the morning class and hanging out in the wings during a performance. 

David Cooper

 

Website: http://davidcooperphotography.com/

Blog made possible by Impact Dance Productions, Founder&CEO Danielle Gardner, http://www.daniellelgardner.com and David Cooper