THANK YOU TO OUR READERS<3

-IMPACT DANCE PRODUCTIONS-

As the dance season comes to a close and students go to summer camp, parents catch up on some much needed wine tasting, readers find new books to get lost in and artists re fuel for the next season our team at Impact Dance Productions like you will be re generating in order to make 2014 the best year possible!.

We thank you for your positive feed back and faith in what we do!. With out our readers we would not be as tenacious about spreading our love of the arts with our community and with the world.

A huge thank you to our guest bloggers: (Order of blog posts)

– Joshua Beamish – Move the company 

– Mike Wollen – Foundry Films

– Kamilah Sturton – Kelowna Ballet

– Joyce Poon – Noir Lash Lounge

– Rachael Porier -Danzmode Productions

– David Cooper-  Photographer

– Sarah Dolan – O2 Company

– Angel Jutzi – Zebra Eye Dance Company

– Linda Arkelian- Instructor & Artist

– Amy Josh- Netherlands Danse Theatre

– Kristina Akester-  Student Dancer

-Robyn Banks- Fashionista

– Menina Fortunato- Dance Professional & Entrepreneur

– Gillian Abbott- Julliard NYC

– Melanie LaPatine- So You Think You Can Dance Choreographer & Celebrity Guest

– Caitlin Griffin- Professional Dancer & Choreographer

– Winnipeg Mother- Annon

– Christie Lee Manning- Industry Dance Magazine

– Dr.Lin- Naturopathic Doctor

– Alexie Geronimo- Bad Boys Of Dance

– Alexandria Crenian- Dancer for Lady Gaga

– Moe Brody- Harbour Dance Centre

– Darla Isfeld- Team Canada 

Impact Dance Productions and http://www.daniellelgardner.com are pleased to announce we will be back in early September featuring some of the finest artists and performers out there. If you missed one of our 25 blog posts this year they will continue to be on our site until next year:)

May your summers be filled with great memories, loving feelings and knowledge insurmountable to any education you have ever had before.

We wish you all a beautiful summer and in the words of Impact Dance Productions “lets make an impact one step at a time”.

Blog Made possible by : http://www.daniellelgardner.com & Impact Dance Productions

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MOE BRODY- MY JOURNEY WITH HARBOUR DANCE CENTER

MOE BRODY: Owner of Vancouvers Hottest Dance Centre

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After finishing her degree in Human Kinetics at UBC, Moe returned to dance with the NBA Grizzlies Extreme Dance Team and then choreographed the CFL’s BC Felions and the creator of UBC’s Dance Team. She has done movies with Hayden Panetteire called I Love You Beth Cooper, for Ashanti and Brittany Snow in the movie John tucker Must Die, Dr. Doolittle 3 and Percy Jackson and The Lightening Thief. She’s done commercials for McDonalds, Barbie, Kyocere, Coca-Cola and Disney. She is also on faculty with The Source, Rise, Danzemode, Groovestreet Productions and Broadway Bound International. As an adjudicator at dance competitions, she derives much satisfaction dispensing helpful advice which she hopes will inspire future dancers. She is co-owner of Harbour Dance Centre in downtown Vancouver where her favorite place to be is in class, sharing a good story or two.

Please enjoy her amazing journey and know its never to late to do what you love!

MOE BRODY- MY JOURNEY WITH HARBOUR DANCE CENTER

How did I become one of the owner’s of Harbour Dance Centre? I have to take you way, way back. It was a long journey, but a great one.

In grade 8, my dance teacher shut down her studio. I found out she started teaching for some friends of hers that had opened a new adult studio. What was it called? Harbour Dance Centre? Never heard of it. I took class from four amazing women: my teacher, Valerie Easton, Belinda Sobie, and the two owners, Pam Rosa and Danielle Clifford. Now you’d think I would have found this haven and never left right? Haven’t you heard of a thing called High School? The drama, fitting in, new friends…yup, they pulled me out of dance and into some excess pounds on my thighs. I stayed at Harbour until about grade 10, then it was bye-bye dance.

My teenage years were hard. I moved out of my mother’s home in grade 12 with no money but a lot of drive to work. I went to UBC with four courses on my plate and three jobs to pay for it all. Dance wasn’t even on my radar. However, it was all I knew. I had no relation to any other passion in my life. Because of this I studied Kinesiology; anything to relate to the body. We analyzed the momentum of a baseball swing or the anatomy breakdown of a basketball free throw….but no one liked my idea of the velocity of a pirouette. Dance was still in me, just way down deep. After graduation, I got a job in Sports Marketing for a new sports franchise in Vancouver (The Vancouver Voodoo Roller Hockey Team). It was here that things took a turn. The President of the (Vancouver Voodoo Roller Hockey) Team suggested we get a Dance Team, some sexy girls to fill the arena. He asked me to do some research on how much this would cost. He and I were shocked to find out how much dance choreographers actually charged. (I had no idea. Like really, no idea). He then said, “Moe, isn’t dance your thing? You’re on salary, this us one of your new tasks in your job description. Get on it!” I panicked. I was now 24 years old and hadn’t really danced in 9 years. I knew how to do the six-step prep for a clean double pirouette, and that about summed it up. Crap! What was I going to do? Wait, Harbour Dance… I wondered if that place is still open. What? Belinda is still teaching? I better get back into class!

With the same dance attire that I left with, parachute shorts, leg warmers, ripped flashdance t-shirt, I put it back on! She gave us a thrashy jazz combo, and I was in heaven. Everything felt so natural, so easy. Why did I ever leave this? In between groups, Belinda stopped the music and walked over to my spot. She got right up to me, face to face and said…..”Moe……you still got it. Where have you been?” Let the bawl-fest begin. Between the tears and the sweat, I left so dehydrated you’d think I was in the desert.

The Dance Team audition went well. Some old familiar faces came through, Joanne Pesusich, Laura Bartlet, Lisa Stevens, Sandi Croft….the old “young” Harbour gang. At the same time, Joanne was planning her move to L.A and had some studio teaching hours to give up. She asked me if I wanted to teach dance. Me? I didn’t know anything except what I learned in the 70’s and early 80’s. She assured me nothing much had changed. So back to Harbour I went to get into ballet and jazz class (as well as some new dance style called hip hop, funny right? )

Since you’ve read my novel, you know my history with Harbour Dance Centre. When I started back up in dance in the mid 90’s, I knew this place was something special. In 2009, Danielle was thinking of retiring. In 2010, it became a discussion. In 2011, it became a reality. Again, I am one lucky girl. The place that gave me my passion back is now something I can call mine.

Special thanks to this weeks guest blogger Moe Brody of Harbour Dance Centre.

Blog made possible by: www.harbourdance.com, www.daniellelgardner.com & Impact Dance Productions

Follow us on Twitter: @IMPACTDancePro / @daniigardner 

“IT ALL STARTS WITH CONFIDENCE” by Christie Manning

Impact Dance Productions is pleased to feature Christie Manning the Creator and Editor-in-Chief of Industry Dance Magazine!

Please Enjoy!

“IT ALL STARTS WITH CONFIDENCE” by Christie Manning

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With 175 + dance studios just in the lower mainland, there are hundreds of thousands of dancers, just in BC alone, leaving their home studio every night with the wish of becoming a professional dancer one day. With the competition being so stiff, how do you set yourself apart? It all comes down to one thing: Confidence.

Before you nod your head and say, ‘Yeah yeah, I’ve heard that before,’ really listen to what I have to say. I want you to think about some of the best dancers you know. What makes them so good? What really sets them apart? Is it the fact that they can do nine pirouettes into a front aerial and land in the splits? Not necessarily. I know some incredible breakers that can’t do nine pirouettes, unless it’s on their head. It’s not the tricks. It’s not their cool hair style, or tattoo down their arm, or even their Free City sweatpants. It’s their confidence.

Every strong dancer knows they aren’t the best, but they know they’re not the worst either. Many dancers suffer from a strong sense of ego, and not in an arrogant way. Most suffer from it more in a self deprecating kind of way. Thinking “I’m not good enough” is coming from a place of ego just as much as “I’m the best” is, it’s just on the opposite side of the scale. There is nothing wrong with acknowledging that you’re talented. Read that again. There is NOTHING wrong with acknowledging that you’re talented. It’s how you present and conduct yourself with that knowledge that matters.

1. Don’t put others up on a pedestal.

Putting your teacher, your choreographer, TV stars, or even your fellow dancers up on a pedestal just keeps you at a place of ‘less than’. You are not worth less than them, are not less than them, just because you think they are stronger, better, more experienced than you. Their training or experiences do not lessen YOUR value. They may be further along their career path than you are, but everyone was where you are at one point along the way.

2. Everyone’s path is different.

One of the most frustrating things in a dancer’s career is that there is no one way to get to where you want to go. There is no diploma or master’s degree you can take that’s a surefire path to success. Every single artist will take different steps towards the career they would like to have. Therefor, it’s also one of the most beautiful things about our career. We have the option, the power, the opportunity, to shape our own career and lifestyle. There are hundreds of thousands of paths we could choose to take. By being confident and understanding who you are as an artist, you can make the appropriate steps towards the future you would like. It will be different from the dancer standing beside you. And it should be.

3. Don’t compare.

One of the most damaging things an artist can do is compare him or herself to others. This will never create anything positive. It is extremely unhealthy and a complete waste of time. You can idolize someone as long as you’d like, you will never be them, no matter how hard you try. And thank god. You will never be as good as the are, because you aren’t them. You are YOU. Why be the second best version of someone else when you could be the best version of yourself?

4. Figure out who you are.

Understanding who you are and where you fit in can be one of the most difficult processes a dancer will face. But what comes with the discovery can be career changing. It is a dancer’s responsibility to figure out what they are passionate about, and where they fit in with in the industry. What makes your heart the happiest? Working with a contemporary company, being on set, touring with an artist? Then ask yourself the hard questions. Do I have the body type and the skills to do what I want to do? If not, where would my body type and skills be most valued? Your goal is to match the two together.

5. Don’t let what you can’t do, discount what you CAN do.

You have skills you have been working hard on your whole career. Just because someone else has skills you don’t have, doesn’t devalue what you DO have. Be confident in the skills that you have. Know what you’re good at, and own it with all your being. Continue to train, work hard, and always be open to learning and growing, but be proud of your accomplishments. The strongest artists out there know what they are capable of, understand their value, and represent themselves as such.

At the end of the day, you just need to remember one thing: Be the best version of yourself. In an industry ( especially in Canada) where there are more artists than there is work, you must remember to keep the focus on yourself. Don’t be distracted by who is doing what, when, where, and how. All you need to focus on is what YOU can do, where YOU want to go, and how YOU are going to get there. Friends and colleagues will come and go, but the relationship you have with yourself is the most important. And that relationship should come with a side of confidence.

Christie Manning- Editor and Chief of Industry Dance Magazine

Blog made possible by Danielle Gardner Founder&CEO of Impact Dance Productions

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @IMPACTDancePro

http://www.daniellelgardner.com

Advice from a beautiful mind by Rachael Poirier

Danielle Gardner and Impact Dance Productions are humbled to share a blog by the one and only  Rachael Poirier Founder and Artistic Director at Danzmode Productions.

Rachael Poirier has greatly impacted many dancers and choreographers around the world including mine (Danielle Gardner). Sit back,enjoy and learn from one of the most amazing choreographers Canada has had the opportunity to call its own.

Dance is fun but mostly hard work, exhausting at times, rejuvenating and exciting at other times.  But we dance because we love the music, the movement, that sweat trickling down our backs, the discipline, the satisfaction of a great performance, rare but attainable, the perfect high.  Dance becomes part of our existence and is hard to let go once it is a part of you.  My biggest advice would be this – always be grateful to the ones that help you whether teachers or family.  We can’t be successful all alone.

There are a lot of people that help and inspire us along the way.  Like yourself, love yourself, respect yourself.  Work hard but at the same time, know what feeds your soul whether it’s spiritually, a walk in nature or spendingtime with your family…Find peace and silence, a calm, beautiful place to go frequently.  Keep good associates, friends, and make sure they are driven and inspired.  Stay free of alcohol and drug use.  Don’t compare yourself to others.  You are unique.  Embrace that, nurture that and fly with that thought.  No once can be compared to you and that is a wonderful special feeling because you are simply yourself.  Don’t try to be like someone else.  Remember art is not valued by a price tag, or a sales pitch, or a great resume.  You simply like it or you don’t.

Embrace difference, whether in people or art, keep creation moving and changing, don’t get stuck. Don’t be afraid to step out of the box.  Don’t worry about what people say, allow yourself to shine and to fail.  So many are driven by the fear of failure, but if you do fail, it usually just means you’ve done something different, and people as much as they profess to love difference, more often than not, it takes a while to accept it or to have the right person doing something different, example; someone famous.  Try hard not to be that person.  Most people arefollowers, try hard to be a leader.  Don’t believe everything you hear, most people feel a great need to over sell themselves, which to me just shows their lack of experience, because the dance industry will always humble you in one way or another.

To the dancers; you must have a great desire to improve and learn from everyone you meet.  Some teachers I disliked I needed the most as they were the ones that were tough, not complementary, they pushed until you cried, they’re the teachers I remember.  Don’t be a dancer that only dances to win an award, or dances for only admiration, you’ll be disappointed.  The ones that have made it (which I consider paying your bills through performing dance), they are tough, humble, hardworking and usually aren’t the ones talking about how successful they are and how much they’ve done or are doing.  Beware that you treat other dancers, studio owners, choreographers as you’d like to be treated.  As soon as you think you’re great and have nothing to learn, you will stop improving.  We are always learning.  Respect your fellow dancers and teachers.  Next time you win a trophy ask yourself where you won it and was there any competition.  Win an international competition like N.Y.C.D.A. or Y.A.G.P. then be proud, then go back to the barre and practice more because really nobody cares if you have bragging rights.  The dance community is small, have many friends that don’t dance.  As lovely as we are, our conversations tend to get a bit boring.

To teachers: treat your dancers like they’re your own children, care that much and they will be successful. Dancers need discipline and direction, they want it, and of course a bit of love.  The dancer you consider the worst in class, challenge yourself if you can make that dancer great, you’re a good teacher, remember that when you want to strangle them.

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“Don’t dance unless you have to.  If you can let it go and do something else that makes you just as happy do it, because it’s tough, it’s hard work, and your body will eventually tire. You must love it”

Rachael Poirier

Blog made possible by: http://www.daniellelgardner.com, http://www.danzmodeproductions.com and Impact Dance Productions

“Something in the Water” by Joshua Beamish

Danielle Gardner Founder of Impact Dance Productions would like to introduce the first of many blog posts that will be featured on www.daniellelgardner.com.

Blogs will be posted by industry greats, casting agents, hair and make up specialist and many more inspiring people.
We hope you enjoy these blogs as much as we have enjoyed creating them!
Team Canada Choreographers Joshua Beamish and  Director Danielle Gardner
January 1st 2013:
The journey through a career in this industry is always unpredictable. Dancers move where the work is, opportunities come and go with hype and the threat of an injury, large or small, is always looming. Many dancemakers have their calendars planned out three years in advance, while other artists are expected to drop everything in an instant to obtain a shot at that lifelong dream contract.

My own career path is perhaps one of the least traditional I’ve come across, having started a professional dance company at 17. In just under a decade, I have already experienced so many genre shifts that I’ve come to realize that many of the students I’m currently working with have no idea that I started out just like them. While I always placed a strong focus on ballet, primarily through the training from my mother Loretta Lachner, there was nothing I loved more than jazz. I was a Triple Threat scholarship student, Kelly Konno was my number one idol and I was sure that I too would end up dancing for Janet Jackson one day. When I heard students getting excited about attending Triple Threat this year it reminded me of how much I gained from opportunities like my Triple Threat, Groove Street or Harbour Dance Centre scholarships. These organizations gave me access to teachers who challenged me with new vocabulary and they put me in a room with the best of my peers. Through Triple Threat I experienced a week of private musical theatre training at Randolph Academy and had the opportunity to attend their first ever Hawaii Dance Experience. My experiences at Groove Street paved the way for my time dancing in the Source Dance Company and Harbour Dance Centre went on to give me support to enable the realization of my first two professional productions. Above all, I most realize that these institutions and instructors taught me that my individuality was an attribute to be celebrated. They made clear that my greatest offering to the dance world was the unique nature of an artistry that was particular to me. I haven’t forgotten this, as this truth has taken me to places I never expected possible.

In the years that have followed I gradually pulled away from the studio and competitive world, creating just a few solos and judging the odd competition. The demands of running my company simply required a complete focus. Everything else in my life took a back seat.
Since my relocation to New York I have ironically spent more time invested in outreach work with BC’s young dancers than ever before. The formation of our annual MOVE: the company Summer Intensive, in addition to creating works for Team Canada and Richmond Academy, reignited a passion for exploring the creativity and capabilities of young artists. In the past year I’ve actually found myself seeking out opportunities to have a hand in opening the minds of the next generation of professional artists. It’s steadily growing into a passion that equals my love for directing professionals.
I believe that there is something so uniquely special about the training of young dancers in British Columbia. Many of my greatest collaborators were groomed in BC’s local schools. One only needs to mention Crystal Pite, Tiffany Tregarthen, Simone Orlando, Celine Gittens and Amber Funk Barton among counless others, to realize how much incredible talent has emerged from the BC studio system. I’ve often wondered what it is that keeps BC consistently producing such evolved young artists. Is the importance placed on ballet training without the tunnel vision focus that it’s the be all and end all of dance? Is it the fact that we still have dance festivals and The Provincials, as well as the dance competition circuit? Is it that we’ve had so many truly great local success stories who’ve undeniably made it, and yet still return to BC to give knowledge and inspiration back to the next wave of movers.
It’s certainly some combination of these factors, among others, but I think that the real secret is that our dance studio ecosystem in BC celebrates the individuality of youth. Children are taught to dance in a group but allowed to grow as soloists. They are taught formalized techniques but are also exposed to improvisation. They are even often encouraged to enter student choreography and music interpretation categories at the festivals.
When I teach in BC I come across far fewer TV dance emulaters than I do anywhere else. This doesn’t mean they altogether ignore widespread mainstream influences, but it does illustrate that they know how to turn off stylistic conventions when asked. Danielle Gardner and Jeff Mortensen, two dancers who move between concert and tv dance careers including contracts with my own company, are perfect examples of artists who deftly balance commercial interest and artistic integrity. In truth, I respect that ability more. After all, being a chameleon is the only way I manged to fund a year of my contemporary dance company’s activities by taking a roles in commercial projects, not least of which being in a Nickelodeon TV movie musical with Kelly Konno.
Thank you for reading
Impact Dance Productions